Portland adaptive reuse

October 2, 2018: Weekly design and building news

Voodoo Doughnut coming to Milwaukie/Oak Grove?
That’s the rumor on the street. The Starbucks on McLoughlin (14620 SE McLoughlin Blvd. to be exact) is moving across the street making room for a huge space that includes the long-ago vacated Pizza Schmizza. And that’s where the new Voodoo would (apparently) go. We’re not convinced.

 Doughnuts, booze and dry cleaning.  Source.

Doughnuts, booze and dry cleaning. Source.

The story behind Oaks Bottom Wildlife Refuge
One of our fave places in Portland has a great story on its creation (involving some guerrilla action). Read the whole story here.

"...armed with a bottle of Jim Beam bourbon (we) proceeded to nail up the signs around the wetland perimeter, thereby establishing, by fiat, that we unilaterally declared the city’s first urban wildlife refuge..."

Speaking of nature in the city…
Portland metro is blessed with the green, right? Rivers, trees, birds. And, though not in Portland, a new study says that being near nature and trees lessens depression and crime. And to prove it, researchers added greenery to city vacant lots and saw people using them more and crime declining. Nature for the win.

An unappreciated mid-century spot in Milwaukie

Downtown Milwaukie is experiencing major changes to its downtown core. From the south Downtown area (there’s an actual crane up in Milwaukie) with two huge mixed-use projects up within a couple of years, to a new library, to more mixed-use dotted along McLoughlin, downtown will look different in 2-3 years. It hasn’t seen this much growth and construction probably since after WW2.

That said, Milwaukie has an impressive stock of mid-century ranch homes sprinkled throughout the neighborhoods that have remained unscathed in their original condition.

Many commercial mid-century buildings also dot the landscape from super-mod churches to office buildings to bowling alleys.

One mid-century building still standing is the (now former) Milwaukie Cleaners building. Almost invisible, since it sits on a desolate part of Main street (most people usually drive by it to hop on 99) it was built in 1959 and designed by Joseph H. Rudd & Associates, a Portland architecture firm. The streamlined design and folded plate roof were commonly found on dry cleaners of the time. The space is a bit striking and unusual, most notably that roof.

According to Leesa Gratreak, MS, Architectural Historian, at HDR, Joseph H. Rudd & Associates was started by Joseph H. Rudd in 1950 after completing his degree in architecture at the University of Oregon. Rudd, originally born in Idaho in 1922, was active in local philanthropy and housing boards in Portland, as well as an active member of the city planning committee in Vancouver, Wash. Rudd continued to design with the firm until his retirement in 1990 and he passed away in 2003.

Examples of additional work include Yaw’s Top Notch Restaurant in Portland; quarters for the Sisters of St. Dominic on the Marycrest High School campus in Portland; a U.S. National Bank Building on Division Street in Portland; as well as numerous residential buildings throughout the Portland metro area.

“The building is an excellent example of mid-century plate glass design and exhibits a folded plate roof and decorative concrete block patterning,” says Gratreak. “The roof is considered a common feature associated with dry cleaners as it allowed a wide overhang for items to be safely transferred into the vehicle.”

Once Milwaukie Cleaners closed shop, the future of the building remained unknown. Just recently, tell-tale signs of a new business showed up—brown paper on the windows—with word on the street that new tenants will be involved in the budding CBD industry.

Want to see downtown Milwaukie’s building history up close? Gratreak will be leading a tour of downtown Milwaukie this Saturday. Go here to sign up.

An 1800s church, beer, and building a community

It started with breakfast in Turner, Oregon.

Chad Casady recalls having breakfast with his wife, Melissa, and neighbors, throwing ideas back and forth, and the abandoned church around the corner came up in conversation. One of the ideas: turn the church into a taphouse.

 After the paint job.  Source.

After the paint job. Source.

So, after breakfast that day, the Casadys and neighbors walked over to the church and found the front door wide opened. “We helped ourselves, took a tour of the place, and it was a disaster,” says Casady. “The inside was not well kept, the whole thing needed to be gutted, the foundation looked pretty bad. Posts and beams were rotten. It looked like it needed some TLC.”

Built in 1891, the 127-year-old church, near Salem, was obviously neglected and that’s when most people would’ve walked away. In fact, it’s seen numerous tenants during the previous decades, with the last tenant living in the basement.

 Deconstruction on interior.  Source.

Deconstruction on interior. Source.

Casady, though, started the reconstruction process. At the beginning of 2015, he started research on the building, then researched construction costs associated with renovating it. He brought in an inspector, a foundation expert to take a look at the foundation and structure, and then a general contractor to map out what it was going to take. Then it was off to the City of Turner.

 Pre-paint job.  Source.

Pre-paint job. Source.

The City was exceptionally helpful, says Casady, but a maybe bit cynical at first.  “When I came in, the city administrator said, “You know how many people have come in, just like you with some grand dream for this building?’ and I said, ‘I'm not in the business of dreaming, I'm business execution here, so if you want to help out, I'm interested in figuring out what it takes to get from step A to step B,’” says Casady.

From there, he continues to work with the city and county numerous times before putting in an offer. And then, even more research.

Demographics, speaking with local business owners about the market, the future of the city, and where they think the city is going. In fact, Turner is starting to see some changes, like a new community-based café that’s been successful. “It’s proving that the community is ready for something cooler than a mill,” says Casady.

So, how does someone like Casady, who has a background in tech (he’s VP of IT at Performance Health Technology in Salem) and no construction experience retrofit a hundred-plus-year-old building?

“I really didn't understand how a lot of the systems worked, you know as far as like putting contracts together, getting approvals and stuff. I've never done a construction project. I was involved in building my own house, but not like this,” he says.

The key to success he believes is having a strong partner (Casady credits his wife Melissa as his true partner), hiring the right contractor, and if you can swing it, someone you know and trust. An old acquaintance, Ryan Records, of Records Construction has been his partner throughout the retrofit, as well as a team of solid subs to help guide the project.

 More deconstruction.  Source.

More deconstruction. Source.

The end game, of course, is to have a community gathering place, serve some local beers (they’re installing a 32-tap system with local beers from Salem including Gilgamesh, Salem Ale Works, Vagabond, and Santiam) as well as other Oregon and west coast beers.

But it’s also a bit more. Casady wanted a taproom, called Angel's Share Barrel House (“Angel’s share” is the portion of alcohol that’s lost to evaporation with aged spirits—”if you want tasty booze, you’ve got to pay the Angels their share,” Casady says), and a place to hang out, but also help build a stronger community. With his own money funding the retrofit he believes the taproom will be more than a beer place.

“To bring something back that has been sitting there for decades, and people have just complained about this building and no one was doing anything about it. This is such an important piece of history for the community and we need to do something with it,” he adds.

A stroll through Portland's West End

James Cook, director of retail research in the Americas for JLL, has an interesting podcast called Where We Buy, “a show about the things we buy and the places we buy them.”

 Source. 

Source. 

In his most recent episode he explores Portland’s West End with Jonathan Ledesma, a partner with developer Project^. They talk about the challenges, opportunities and the transformation of the West End through adaptive reuse.

 Union Way: The shops may have changed since its opening,  but the design still shines. 

Union Way: The shops may have changed since its opening,  but the design still shines. 

The two projects highlighted include Blackbox, a retail and creative space in a historic brick building, and Union Way, the shopping alley that connects two streets through two former night clubs. I'm probably not the target shopping audience for Union Way but I still love its aesthetics, the vibe, the design (those flush-mounted floor lights...), and the fact that it magically empties out to Powell's (how convenient). It's the perfect example of a building being reborn as a fun and useful space. 

Grab a beverage and give the episodes a listen.

Crowdfunding a neighborhood hang-out: Ye Olde Towne Crier

Crowdfunding for retrofitting local buildings is one intriguing idea. I like it for a couple of reasons: One, the return is making your own neighborhood better or more livable and two the return is pretty immediate. You invest in a building around the corner, you can see the work being done daily. I also like it because you don’t have to invest handfuls of cash—for a crowdfunding site like NextSeed, the minimum is $100. Throw in an adaptive reuse component and it sounds even more appealing.

 Rendering of the new version.  Source.

Rendering of the new version. Source.

This brings us to a local project in Portland (in Woodstock): the Ye Olde Towne Crier (you might know it better as Grandma’s, copious smoking, and karaoke). Here’s the scoop: Tacee Webb, who has a 19 year career in retail, real estate and retail development, is retrofitting the space and naming it (actually going back to its original name) Ye Olde Towne Crier. The goal is to retrofit it “as a multi-level ode to Portland’s past and its current residents, a place to chat and dine among one another and enjoy the city’s brightest talent.” 

So, why NextSeed? According to their website, “investing isn’t just for Wall Street and Silicon Valley. Everyone can now access exclusive investment opportunities and build a financial portfolio with local businesses.” The company focuses on helping consumer-facing, brick-and-mortar businesses in the food and beverage, health and wellness, fitness, hospitality and co-working industries.

 Towne Crier, 1953.  Source. 

Towne Crier, 1953. Source. 

And, according to Webb, by using NextSeed, “the risk is being absorbed so you don’t have to lose your house. It’s a higher risk for start-ups; this lets them get investors in a less riskier way.” 

The project currently has raised $13,900 by 30 investors.

Webb hopes the Towne Crier will become a community gathering and destination spot as well as a local hangout for students of the Reed College neighborhood and locals from the Creston-Kenilworth community. The attached Treasury Cafe and Lounge will provide morning-evening service. Nighttime entertainment will include live music and whisky tastings featuring local musicians and artisans. Preeminent spirits expert Stuart Ramsay will oversee curation of the bar program.

“There are so many stories and it feels like a patchwork quilt that’s perfect for a community project," says Webb. "There are many former customers in their 60s and 70s that have some great stories and we think it will help provide a sense of a place for them." 

The new space will also be a sort of repository for lost Portland restaurant artifacts: The stained glass windows are from Embers, the vintage neon Lounge sign (and its HVAC system) comes from The Overlook, while chandeliers from Der Rheinlander will grace the ceiling. 

If you’re interested in helping fund the project (or any project), NextSeed provides some pretty decent details, from key terms, location analysis, and revenue sharing summary.

If you’re interested in retrofitting an old building in your own neighborhood, NextSeed is a good start. It doesn't actually finance real estate purchases (Webb owns the building; she purchased it in 2017) but it can help you get on the path, and you’re going to need to be nailed down with your financials and have some semblance of a business plan (this is real estate, not a widget you’re working on). 

Parting advice from Webb: “Have a strong team and partners. I’m not a restaurateur but my partner is. That’s been so helpful.”

Milwaukie mystery structure

Celebrate Milwaukie's Facebook page posted an interesting pic of a half-built commercial structure. Looking like a cross between a building kit, a Q-Hut and a 1950s sci-fi movie spaceship, the modular structure is located on King Road just east of the Milwaukie line.

37582223_1888104451229041_116541699898998784_n.jpg

What makes it even more intriguing is that, at one point, the location (or at least close to it) was going to be the new home of Clay's Smokehouse when they closed on Division. (They're back on Division and killing it.) The property on King was dormant for years, until the structure just kind of appeared a couple months back.

We checked records and found nothing. 

Zidell Yards statement on next steps, wood skyscraper DOA, Portland Building...leggings?

More on Zidell Yards
Jay Zidell, president of ZRZ Realty Company, released a statement on their site today. Here's a blurb from it: 


After lengthy negotiations with the City of Portland, we’ve decided to mutually terminate the Development Agreement for Zidell Yards. 

It comes down to two simple things: the cost of public infrastructure and the need to secure outside funding. The public infrastructure that would have been a part of Zidell Yards included ten acres of new public parks and Greenway, new public docks and a publicly accessible beach as well as the extension of Bond Avenue and significant investments in affordable housing.

We were happy to contribute as much as we could to these projects, but we compete for financing with projects across the city and nation. Zidell Yards could not bear the sizable additional infrastructure costs the City was requesting and still generate the market returns needed to secure outside funding. 

Central Eastside gets (yet) another new tenant
After nearly 10 years on Mississippi Avenue, Animal Traffic is relocating to the Central Eastside. Well known for their vintage clothes, Animal Traffic will occupy a 2.465 SF space with a 1,650 SF showroom in the newly renovated Taylor Works Building at 134 SE Taylor Street. Alongside their highly curated clothing selection will be a new shoe lounge. Animal Traffic will be an exclusive retailer of Dr. Marten’s Made in England line for men and women.

Tower of wood no more
Willamette Week reported that the "deal to build a record-setting wooden Portland tower that was expected to be the tallest in North America is off." It was going to be 12 stories tall and constructed from cross-laminated timber. Reason: the costs were too high.

Portland Building Leggings
It's exactly what you think it is. Portland Design Events, the "premier website for finding and sharing architecture and design-related events in Portland, Oregon," (and a favorite site of ours) also has a store where you can buy Portland design-inspired items. Like? Like these Portland Building leggings

leggings.jpg

Headline of the week: CVS commits urban malpractice with generic store designs that poison neighborhoods
One, the Dallas Morning News has an architecture critic. That's rad. How many daily newspaper have an architecture critic any more? (Thankfully we have Brian Libby's Portland Architecture.) Two, this review takes apart a new Dallas CVS, piece by piece. Here's a nice nugget: 

The interior design is manipulative, but the exteriors are worse, for they actively encourage unhealthy behavior by abetting an auto-centric lifestyle and making the city actively worse for anyone who would prefer or requires other means of mobility, above all walking.

Orange Line Ale Trail; Westmoreland church for sale; new Central Eastside shuttle

The Orange Line Ale Trail
Ok, it's not really a thing but it could be, drinking beers without driving, from downtown Milwaukie to Tilikum Crossing. Here's a quick take on your beery adventure. 

 Orange Line Ale Trail.  Source

Orange Line Ale Trail. Source

First (or last) stop: Beer Store Milwaukie. Revolving taps, OK food, bottles and cans. 

Next stop: Ruse Brewing, located in the Iron Fireman Collective building (after 7/14!). 

Hop back on Max,then get off at the Clinton stop and head to Apex, BeerMongers then Los Gorditos. Depending on your state, you can get back on Max or walk to Tillikum Crossing to enjoy more beers at the recently opened Mt. Hood Brewery at Tilikum Station. If you're feeling adventurous, hoof it down Water Avenue for 20 minutes where you can hit up Hair of the Dog, Produce Row Cafe, and Wayfinder. (But that's a different post for a different kind of blog.) 

Update: Looks like The Portland Mercury thinks the same thing. 

 Mt. Hood Brewery's new spot offers beers, pizza, a refurbished caboose as a dining room, and a front-row seat of the Orange Line and train museum across the street. 

Mt. Hood Brewery's new spot offers beers, pizza, a refurbished caboose as a dining room, and a front-row seat of the Orange Line and train museum across the street. 

New shuttle in Central Eastside
Not to keep talking about beer, but... if you want to keep your beerventure going (or need to get to work) you can always keep walking down Water Avenue to a handful of breweries and taprooms. Or? Take the just-launched Water Avenue Courtesy Shuttle, for free. It runs from 6:30am to 9:30am and 4pm-7pm. with stops including the Dairy Building parking lot, Oregon Rail Heritage Center parking lot, North OMSI parking lot, ODOT Block parking lot, Eastside Exchange parking lot and Oregon Convention Center. Prowling around Central Eastside yesterday, we saw it cruise by pretty frequently. 

shuttle.png

Mid-century church in Westmoreland a goner?
We always liked this mid-century church building but it might not be around for very much longer. Though the land is currently zoned R-1 and R-5, there’s a pending zone change of the entire site to R-1, a medium-density residential zone. Allowed uses include condominiums, apartments, duplexes, townhouses, and row homes. We’ll be watching what happens next.

Nature in the city
A quick note for NextDoor posters that post (which seems like every week) that they SPOTTED A COYOTE ON OUR STREET HOW DID IT GET HERE THIS IS A GOOD NEIGHBORHOOD: those coyotes aren't going anywhere (and were probably there first). In fact, they might be trotting around your backyard even more while you sleep.

According to new research, human activity is forcing mammals to become more active during the night—because humans are disrupting them. Night noises just got more interesting. 

So long, Lotus Cafe; New brewery & drinking map in Central Eastside; Overland Warehouse retrofit

The Lotus is no more
Avert your eyes if you don't want to see the destruction of The Lotus. The Oregonian reported that it originally opened in 1906 (!!) at the corner of Southwest Third Avenue and Salmon Street as the Hotel Albion. The building was known for the Lotus Café and Cardroom from 1924. It continued as a hopping nightspot until its closure in 2016. YouTuber Steve the Historian hustled down there and shot some video: 

Mt. Hood Brewing opens its Central Eastside location this weekend
Snuggled at the foot of the Tilikum Bridge at a former TriMet transfer station (now called Bruun Dock Studios) we think the location will work for them. Even if they only got commuters hopping off the Orange Line for a quick pint and a pizza they'll rock it. Another win for Central Eastside. 

Speaking of the Central Eastside (and booze)
The folks at Conveyor have put together a micro-site of the history of the Central Eastside as well as a map of places to grab a drink. You can walk, hike, even bike it. (If you drive it, you won't find parking. And if you're drinking you shouldn't be driving. Wags finger.) If you're old school like me, look for hard copies of the map at selected establishments.

Adaptive reuse of the week: Overland Warehouse
Originally built as a warehouse in 1889, Overland Warehouse has served as temporary housing for immigrant families, a neighborhood market, and a nightclub over the years.

In 2016, UD+P completed a full renovation that preserved and restored its historic structural elements while adding modern features that are needed for today’s creative office tenants. Unique among older brick buildings in downtown Portland, Overland features a stunning atrium built into the third floor that brings light down to the center of the building.

As part of the renovation, the building underwent a complete seismic retrofit.

And, just last month Restore Oregon presented the Overland Warehouse design and development team with a 2018 DeMuro Award.

 

 

 

Indoor skatepark coming to Milwaukie?

It appears so.

36382049_921441577635_641044858433175552_n.jpg

 

From their website

We are very excited to announce that after a very long search with many ups and downs we have found a space and signed a lease in Milwaukie just outside of SE Portland! At over 5000 sq feet with a party room in the back, its the perfect space for a new indoor park and we can't wait to see you there!

They'll be doing a pre-sale to help fund the building of the park, with the opportunity to buy sessions and memberships at a deep discount. Looks like they're opening at Wichita Town Center on King next to Urban Warrior. 

Stronger Skatepark says it will "provide a safe and clean space for people of all ages and abilities to engage in skateboarding and the local community." They'll also offer open skate times, camps, lessons, parties and other events.

Cool. Check out their website for more info. 

12 Portland skyscrapers that changed Portland; Small-scale manufacturing in Central Eastside; Booming South Downtown Milwaukie

The word skyscraper might be a stretch, regardless, this piece goes deep (or is that high?) on 12 Portland skyscrapers that changed the city for good (and bad).  I don't normally recommend reading the comments from OregonLive but there's a lively discussion on buildings missed (of course there's the old-timer lamenting how much downtown has changed since—fill in blank of the decade when they peaked/moved here). Great pics throughout, too. I love it when the Oregonian dives into its pic morgue. And for the record, where's the Weatherly

Portland Small-Scale Manufacturing
White papers don't exactly instill a sense of excitement but this one is pretty fascinating. It's called The State of Urban Manufacturing Portland City Snapshot. Stay with me. 

In a nutshell, the white paper helps to try and understand what the small-batch manufacturing sector looks like, who its "entrepreneurs and employees are, and what cities can do to help these firms thrive and grow into larger jobs generators, and retain them within the urban core." 

One of the cities that the The Urban Manufacturing Alliance profiled is Portland. And one of the key takeaways I got (and, sure, I'm cherry-picking) is that manufacturing job growth between 2010 and 2016 was most evident in the Central Eastside district, where it increased by 30 percent. I'm intrigued by small-scale manufacturing and how individuals and companies are making stuff, not outside of cities, but right in the middle in places like the Central Eastside

The downside? 

Affordable space represents the most urgent challenge facing manufacturers in Portland today, especially smaller, fast-growing companies that prefer to accommodate their expansions within city limits.

Milwaukie has a lot going in South Downtown
And, they've got a new website to prove it. South Downtown wasn't even a thing like 5 years ago. And now? Here's some of what's going to be completed (whoa?) by 2019-2020. 

  • Axletree apartments, a new five-story, mixed-use development.
  • Kronberg Park Multi-Use Walkway
  • Coho Point at Kellogg Creek, an opportunity site for a 5-story mixed-use building.
  • A new high school 
  • A new space for the Milwaukie Farmer's Market

That's just some of the projects.

 The future site of Coho Landing in South Downtown Milwaukie. The current building will be demolished.  Source. 

The future site of Coho Landing in South Downtown Milwaukie. The current building will be demolished. Source. 

Small-scale on Division
Took a stroll down Division in today (as I do every couple of years) and was— as usual—blown away by the changes. I like that these kind of workhouse buildings (see pic) are still around. Two-story, retail on bottom, housing on top. Could this even get built anymore? Does code even allow that? 

 Small-scale still exists along Division (surrounded by new construction). 

Small-scale still exists along Division (surrounded by new construction). 

Guild Theatre gets new life; mid-century in Milwaukie; new pedestrian bridge in Forest Park

We've got to admit it was touch and go with the Guild. It was in disrepair for years, then vacant. (Buildings that are vacant for long periods of time always us nervous.) It was originally built in 1927 as the Taylor Street Theatre until 1948 when it was renamed, renovated in 1956, then closed in 2006. But wait! It was renovated in 2016. Original plans called for it to be used as a theater, but that came to pass. Until this year, it sat vacant. And now, Willamette Week reports that it will get a new resident—Japan's Kinokuniya Books. Chalk that up as a win. 

Milwaukie Cleaners closing
Dry cleaners closing their doors isn't exactly breaking news. However, this one piques our interest. One, it's a cool structure. Two, it's a hidden mid-century gem. Three, it would make a great spot for something other than a dry cleaner? Restaurant? Beer-something? Coffee shop? Market? The Architecture Heritage Center did a walking tour of downtown Milwaukie last year that (we think) that featured it. (They're doing another one in the fall.) 

Beers Made by Walking and a new pedestrian bridge in Forest Park
If you've never done the Beers Made by Walking hike, do it. Last weekend, we had the chance to wander around with Forest Park folks and brewers from Hopworks and Reverend Nat's Hard Cider. The two-hour walk provided a chance to see a new Metro trail under construction, a 500-year-old cedar, and a forest —mere miles from downtown Portland. 

Closer to town on Burnside in Forest Park it was recently announced the Burnside Wildwood Trail crossing has enough funds to be built. After support from myriad of sources, including Portland Parks & Recreation, Metro, major family and public foundations, private donations, and crowdsourcing, construction is predicted to start in late summer. 

 Based on a stunning design inspired by the concept of a “bridge floating in the woods” by Ed Carpenter, an artist from Portland.  Source. 

Based on a stunning design inspired by the concept of a “bridge floating in the woods” by Ed Carpenter, an artist from Portland. Source. 

Brick buildings: cute, but deadly; Milwaukie growth spurt; demolition porn; welcome to South Portland

Historical brick buildings, also known as unreinforced masonry buildings or URMs, "make up nine percent of the buildings in Portland. Though charming, they’re the most dangerous places to be in or near during an earthquake" (which can happen tomorrow or 100 years from now). So, what's Portland going to do? Tear them all down? Make owners pay a bajillion dollars to reinforce? Replace them with boring, vanilla condos? Glad I'm not the one making decisions around here. 

 Interesting, leaky roof. Presuming this one's coming down when sold.  Source. 

Interesting, leaky roof. Presuming this one's coming down when sold. Source. 

Downtown Milwaukie (or DTM—too soon?) is on the cusp of a huge building boom. There's new construction ready to start for the Axletree (110 units) and the rumor of a brewery on the bottom floor. Next door Coho Point at Kellogg Creek, a five-story mixed-use project is in the works.  And if you cross McLoughlin, there's an interesting piece of property for sale in one of the few commercially zoned properties within the area. My guess is a tear-down. The roof leaks, it looks like it's going to collapse, it's a unique style. Watching this one for sure. 

 The Axletree in downtown Milwaukie.  Source. 

The Axletree in downtown Milwaukie. Source. 

Portland DJC posted a photo essay of demolition porn last week. The old Portland Music Co. building is a goner. Its replacement will be a "six-story, cross-laminated-timber building." (Portland Music Co. moved down to Oak Grove on McLoughlin, by the way.)

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Portland is moving closer to changing mailing addresses for nearly 10,000 businesses and homes in what would be the most significant change to the city's address book since the Great Depression.  For some of you in Southwest, you will now be in South Portland.

Renovating on SE Grand, property for sale in Oak Grove, Willamette Falls back on track

Michael Andersen looks at Portland's infamous 1924 rezoning legacy that launched a "century of exclusion." 

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Great news! After a brief hiccup, the Willamette Falls riverwalk project is back on track. (Sorry—PBJ subscribers only.) 

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 For sale across from the Park Avenue Max stop—four parcels for a total of 27,014 SF lot. The site also includes a 4,752 SF industrial-flex building. The property is "ideal for owner use or a redevelopment opportunity."  Source. 

For sale across from the Park Avenue Max stop—four parcels for a total of 27,014 SF lot. The site also includes a 4,752 SF industrial-flex building. The property is "ideal for owner use or a redevelopment opportunity." Source. 

Down in Oak Grove at the last Max stop, a key piece of property has been listed for sale. The whole corner is ripe for development. On one side you have the station, across from that is Max parking, then a 7-Eleven. With a local organization (Oak Grove is unincorporated) working with the county to re-imagine the intersection (e.g., introducing code so more sprawl doesn't get thrown up on McLoughlin) this might be a viable intersection someday. 

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Lorentz Bruun Construction announced on its Instagram page that they're in the process of renovating an old furniture store on Grand (716 SE Grand). Built in 1904, the brick-cladded building had a modern facade plopped on in 1979. The building is next to Dig a Pony and Kachka. Bruun recently adapted the Iron Fireman warehouse building (1721-1799 SE Schiller St.) in SE Portland (coming soon: Ruse Brewing) and are working on the new Central Eastside Mt. Hood Brewery location at OMSI. 

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 There's brick behind that 1970s facade.  Source.  

There's brick behind that 1970s facade. Source. 

Speaking of beer (when are we not), down in Oregon City, First City Ale House (great name) has applied to the OLCC for a taproom on Main Street. Oregon City is booming.