Brick buildings: cute, but deadly; Milwaukie growth spurt; demolition porn; welcome to South Portland

Historical brick buildings, also known as unreinforced masonry buildings or URMs, "make up nine percent of the buildings in Portland. Though charming, they’re the most dangerous places to be in or near during an earthquake" (which can happen tomorrow or 100 years from now). So, what's Portland going to do? Tear them all down? Make owners pay a bajillion dollars to reinforce? Replace them with boring, vanilla condos? Glad I'm not the one making decisions around here. 

 Interesting, leaky roof. Presuming this one's coming down when sold.  Source. 

Interesting, leaky roof. Presuming this one's coming down when sold. Source. 

Downtown Milwaukie (or DTM—too soon?) is on the cusp of a huge building boom. There's new construction ready to start for the Axletree (110 units) and the rumor of a brewery on the bottom floor. Next door Coho Point at Kellogg Creek, a five-story mixed-use project is in the works.  And if you cross McLoughlin, there's an interesting piece of property for sale in one of the few commercially zoned properties within the area. My guess is a tear-down. The roof leaks, it looks like it's going to collapse, it's a unique style. Watching this one for sure. 

 The Axletree in downtown Milwaukie.  Source. 

The Axletree in downtown Milwaukie. Source. 

Portland DJC posted a photo essay of demolition porn last week. The old Portland Music Co. building is a goner. Its replacement will be a "six-story, cross-laminated-timber building." (Portland Music Co. moved down to Oak Grove on McLoughlin, by the way.)

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Portland is moving closer to changing mailing addresses for nearly 10,000 businesses and homes in what would be the most significant change to the city's address book since the Great Depression.  For some of you in Southwest, you will now be in South Portland.