Zidell Yards statement on next steps, wood skyscraper DOA, Portland Building...leggings?

More on Zidell Yards
Jay Zidell, president of ZRZ Realty Company, released a statement on their site today. Here's a blurb from it: 


After lengthy negotiations with the City of Portland, we’ve decided to mutually terminate the Development Agreement for Zidell Yards. 

It comes down to two simple things: the cost of public infrastructure and the need to secure outside funding. The public infrastructure that would have been a part of Zidell Yards included ten acres of new public parks and Greenway, new public docks and a publicly accessible beach as well as the extension of Bond Avenue and significant investments in affordable housing.

We were happy to contribute as much as we could to these projects, but we compete for financing with projects across the city and nation. Zidell Yards could not bear the sizable additional infrastructure costs the City was requesting and still generate the market returns needed to secure outside funding. 

Central Eastside gets (yet) another new tenant
After nearly 10 years on Mississippi Avenue, Animal Traffic is relocating to the Central Eastside. Well known for their vintage clothes, Animal Traffic will occupy a 2.465 SF space with a 1,650 SF showroom in the newly renovated Taylor Works Building at 134 SE Taylor Street. Alongside their highly curated clothing selection will be a new shoe lounge. Animal Traffic will be an exclusive retailer of Dr. Marten’s Made in England line for men and women.

Tower of wood no more
Willamette Week reported that the "deal to build a record-setting wooden Portland tower that was expected to be the tallest in North America is off." It was going to be 12 stories tall and constructed from cross-laminated timber. Reason: the costs were too high.

Portland Building Leggings
It's exactly what you think it is. Portland Design Events, the "premier website for finding and sharing architecture and design-related events in Portland, Oregon," (and a favorite site of ours) also has a store where you can buy Portland design-inspired items. Like? Like these Portland Building leggings

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Headline of the week: CVS commits urban malpractice with generic store designs that poison neighborhoods
One, the Dallas Morning News has an architecture critic. That's rad. How many daily newspaper have an architecture critic any more? (Thankfully we have Brian Libby's Portland Architecture.) Two, this review takes apart a new Dallas CVS, piece by piece. Here's a nice nugget: 

The interior design is manipulative, but the exteriors are worse, for they actively encourage unhealthy behavior by abetting an auto-centric lifestyle and making the city actively worse for anyone who would prefer or requires other means of mobility, above all walking.