portland

On display: Vintage 1970s Douglas Fir model of downtown Portland

This totally escaped my radar but there’s a vintage 1970s Douglas Fir model of downtown Portland on display as part of Converge 45’s installation of Ann Hamilton's, Habitus, at Centennial Mill through September 16.

In the early days of Portland’s downtown renaissance, Portland planners created a civic ritual for thinking about new development: including this crafted Douglas fir model of the city. For years, as a requirement of design review, developers and architects were required to bring any proposed downtown building, scaled in white cardboard, and place in the city model.

Randy Gragg is currently working on an exhibit idea to combine it with new “models” of other districts of the city—current or aspired to—for Design Week Portland 2019.

If you’re not busy 8/28 or 8/30, Gragg will also be presenting some ideas to “inspire community groups, developers, designers and leaders to think about the larger context of their districts and their city.”

Here’s a quick schedule

August 28: 5:30-7 pm, Tuesday, August 28—Short talk at 6

August 30: Noon-1:30 pm—Short talk at 12:30

Where: Centennial Mills, NW Naito Parkway & NW 9th Avenue (Look for the signs leading to Converge 45 and Habitus)

Please RSVP: randygraggprojects@gmail.com

Gerding Edlen will lead development of OMSI property

Yeah, it’s not exactly “small-scale” but it’s worth noting (and we’ll definitely be following and posting more) since it has the potential to completely change Central Eastside.

The Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) announced today it has selected the master developer with whom it will partner on the development of its 18-acre riverfront campus: Gerding Edlen. They’ll provide strategic support and guidance for the OMSI team, working with them and other firms on a long-term vision for the development of the site.

Multiple firms, including many local entities, will be part of the development team led by Gerding Edlen and will play important roles in the development of the OMSI property including SERA Architects, The Farkas Group, URBAN.SYSTEMS, and Long Haul Capitall

Source. 

Source. 

Next steps for OMSI and the Gerding Edlen team include a planning process, which will lead to an application for a Central City Master Plan and a Development Agreement with the City of Portland for public infrastructure. Gerding Edlen will also begin to work with its team to develop innovative infrastructure solutions that they hope to implement as part of the redevelopment.

Read more about the project here and here.

Orange Line Ale Trail; Westmoreland church for sale; new Central Eastside shuttle

The Orange Line Ale Trail
Ok, it's not really a thing but it could be, drinking beers without driving, from downtown Milwaukie to Tilikum Crossing. Here's a quick take on your beery adventure. 

Orange Line Ale Trail.  Source

Orange Line Ale Trail. Source

First (or last) stop: Beer Store Milwaukie. Revolving taps, OK food, bottles and cans. 

Next stop: Ruse Brewing, located in the Iron Fireman Collective building (after 7/14!). 

Hop back on Max,then get off at the Clinton stop and head to Apex, BeerMongers then Los Gorditos. Depending on your state, you can get back on Max or walk to Tillikum Crossing to enjoy more beers at the recently opened Mt. Hood Brewery at Tilikum Station. If you're feeling adventurous, hoof it down Water Avenue for 20 minutes where you can hit up Hair of the Dog, Produce Row Cafe, and Wayfinder. (But that's a different post for a different kind of blog.) 

Update: Looks like The Portland Mercury thinks the same thing. 

Mt. Hood Brewery's new spot offers beers, pizza, a refurbished caboose as a dining room, and a front-row seat of the Orange Line and train museum across the street. 

Mt. Hood Brewery's new spot offers beers, pizza, a refurbished caboose as a dining room, and a front-row seat of the Orange Line and train museum across the street. 

New shuttle in Central Eastside
Not to keep talking about beer, but... if you want to keep your beerventure going (or need to get to work) you can always keep walking down Water Avenue to a handful of breweries and taprooms. Or? Take the just-launched Water Avenue Courtesy Shuttle, for free. It runs from 6:30am to 9:30am and 4pm-7pm. with stops including the Dairy Building parking lot, Oregon Rail Heritage Center parking lot, North OMSI parking lot, ODOT Block parking lot, Eastside Exchange parking lot and Oregon Convention Center. Prowling around Central Eastside yesterday, we saw it cruise by pretty frequently. 

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Mid-century church in Westmoreland a goner?
We always liked this mid-century church building but it might not be around for very much longer. Though the land is currently zoned R-1 and R-5, there’s a pending zone change of the entire site to R-1, a medium-density residential zone. Allowed uses include condominiums, apartments, duplexes, townhouses, and row homes. We’ll be watching what happens next.

Nature in the city
A quick note for NextDoor posters that post (which seems like every week) that they SPOTTED A COYOTE ON OUR STREET HOW DID IT GET HERE THIS IS A GOOD NEIGHBORHOOD: those coyotes aren't going anywhere (and were probably there first). In fact, they might be trotting around your backyard even more while you sleep.

According to new research, human activity is forcing mammals to become more active during the night—because humans are disrupting them. Night noises just got more interesting. 

Brick buildings: cute, but deadly; Milwaukie growth spurt; demolition porn; welcome to South Portland

Historical brick buildings, also known as unreinforced masonry buildings or URMs, "make up nine percent of the buildings in Portland. Though charming, they’re the most dangerous places to be in or near during an earthquake" (which can happen tomorrow or 100 years from now). So, what's Portland going to do? Tear them all down? Make owners pay a bajillion dollars to reinforce? Replace them with boring, vanilla condos? Glad I'm not the one making decisions around here. 

Interesting, leaky roof. Presuming this one's coming down when sold.  Source. 

Interesting, leaky roof. Presuming this one's coming down when sold. Source. 

Downtown Milwaukie (or DTM—too soon?) is on the cusp of a huge building boom. There's new construction ready to start for the Axletree (110 units) and the rumor of a brewery on the bottom floor. Next door Coho Point at Kellogg Creek, a five-story mixed-use project is in the works.  And if you cross McLoughlin, there's an interesting piece of property for sale in one of the few commercially zoned properties within the area. My guess is a tear-down. The roof leaks, it looks like it's going to collapse, it's a unique style. Watching this one for sure. 

The Axletree in downtown Milwaukie.  Source. 

The Axletree in downtown Milwaukie. Source. 

Portland DJC posted a photo essay of demolition porn last week. The old Portland Music Co. building is a goner. Its replacement will be a "six-story, cross-laminated-timber building." (Portland Music Co. moved down to Oak Grove on McLoughlin, by the way.)

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Portland is moving closer to changing mailing addresses for nearly 10,000 businesses and homes in what would be the most significant change to the city's address book since the Great Depression.  For some of you in Southwest, you will now be in South Portland.